Students prefer warm weather

Second-year+creative+writing+student+Magdaline+Thompson+bundles+up+against+the+cold+weather.
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Students prefer warm weather

Second-year creative writing student Magdaline Thompson bundles up against the cold weather.

Second-year creative writing student Magdaline Thompson bundles up against the cold weather.

Gerald Maravanyika

Second-year creative writing student Magdaline Thompson bundles up against the cold weather.

Gerald Maravanyika

Gerald Maravanyika

Second-year creative writing student Magdaline Thompson bundles up against the cold weather.

Brayden Nazarian, Sports Editor

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More than half of students in a poll on the Arnold Campus said they prefer warm weather over the cold.

In an informal poll of 25 students, 13 said they like warm weather, 10 expressed their fondness for the cold and two said they don’t have a preference.

As winter approaches, some students said they have been reluctant to adapt to the change in climate.

“Specifically, with warmer weather,” said Ren Bishop, a second-year psychology student, “I tend to be drawn outside more—especially in the Quad. I can study outside; I can enjoy nature. I just feel it’s more relaxing to be in warmer weather compared to colder weather.”

Bishop said she tends to feel happier in spring and summer compared with fall and winter.

First-year intelligence analytics student Jacob Dear said he thinks the change in weather influences students’ energy levels.

“During winter, because of how cold it is, I usually do feel … like there is minimal heat here,” Dear said. “In the summer, it’s quite literally more energy, because heat is energy. So obviously you feel [livelier] in the spring and summer.”

Letha Valiaveedu, a counselor at AACC, said she thinks students tend to be more anxious in winter months because of final exams—not because of the weather.

“I think generally speaking,” Valiaveedu said, “students have more exams and assignments in the winter … and that can alter students with anxiety and depression. … But I think Seasonal Affective Disorder happens in the winter.”

Seasonal Affective Disorder is a type of depression associated with seasonal changes.

But some students said they prefer the chill of winter.

“I love cold weather,” said Jake Brannon, a second-year communications student. “Winter is one of my favorite seasons. I love being able to dress up all nice and warm.”

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