Courses assist in reading

Professor+Forrest+Caskey+teaches+first-year+interior+design+student+Jalaya+Stevens+%28left%29%2C+and+first-year+physical+therapy+student+Mariah+Melendez.
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Courses assist in reading

Professor Forrest Caskey teaches first-year interior design student Jalaya Stevens (left), and first-year physical therapy student Mariah Melendez.

Professor Forrest Caskey teaches first-year interior design student Jalaya Stevens (left), and first-year physical therapy student Mariah Melendez.

Daniel Salomon

Professor Forrest Caskey teaches first-year interior design student Jalaya Stevens (left), and first-year physical therapy student Mariah Melendez.

Daniel Salomon

Daniel Salomon

Professor Forrest Caskey teaches first-year interior design student Jalaya Stevens (left), and first-year physical therapy student Mariah Melendez.

Daniel Salomon, Multimedia Producer

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AACC offers classes for students who need help with their reading and writing skills.

The Department of Reading offers developmental courses that teach students how to read and write analytically, create a thesis and organize essays.

According to assistant professor Antione Tomlin, the intention of the reading program is to prepare students for college courses.

“We want to see them go above and beyond,” Tomlin said. “We want to see them be successful in their next level of college English.”

One of the program’s three courses is Reading 040: Academic Literacies and, according to assistant professor Forrest Caskey, discussion topics focus mainly on the concepts of family, education, technology, race, culture, and gender and sexuality.

“I think certain people who aren’t good at essays should be recommended for this class,” Mariah Melendez, a first-year physical therapy student who takes Reading 040, said.

Another course, Reading 026: Reading Your World, is “for our students whose placement indicates that they are the lowest skilled,” Kerry Taylor, chair of the Reading Department, said.

“Even if you’re good at writing essays you could always use the extra help because you can always get better,” Jalaya Stevens, a first-year interior design student taking Reading 040, said.

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