Students alter habits for Lent

Students+on+campus+give+up+meat%2C+television%2C+caffeine%2C+sweets%2C+video+games+and+sarcasm+in+honor+of+Lent.+
Back to Article
Back to Article

Students alter habits for Lent

Students on campus give up meat, television, caffeine, sweets, video games and sarcasm in honor of Lent.

Students on campus give up meat, television, caffeine, sweets, video games and sarcasm in honor of Lent.

Photo by Brad Dress

Students on campus give up meat, television, caffeine, sweets, video games and sarcasm in honor of Lent.

Photo by Brad Dress

Photo by Brad Dress

Students on campus give up meat, television, caffeine, sweets, video games and sarcasm in honor of Lent.

Elizabeth Spearman, Campus Life Editor

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






AACC students who observe Lent gave up a wide array of indulgences for the 40-day season.

In an informal poll of 20 students, four said they gave up meat, three said they quit watching TV and four said they went caffeine-free.

And three students said they made a pact to give up social media.

“I usually just do the standard; giving up meat for the 40 days, but I wanted to try something different this year,” Alex Fogt, a second-year transfer student, said. “So I convinced my best friend and another friend of ours to give up social media.”

Additionally, one student gave up sweets, and another put away video games.

Finally, one student is trying to give up being sarcastic, and another stopped sleeping on a bed for the Lenten season.
Lent is a Christian season of repentance, fasting and preparation leading up to Easter Sunday. Commonly observed by Roman Catholics, Methodists and other Christians, it starts on Ash Wednesday—March 1 this year—and ends on Holy Thursday, three days before Easter.

Lent reminds believers of the time when Jesus went into the wilderness and fasted for 40 days, so in turn, they abstain from eating meat on Fridays and give up other indulgences for the same number of days.

“To me, Lent is not just about giving something up; it is about becoming closer to Jesus, changing my ways and being a better person,” Sydnie White, a graphic design student, said.

While most people fast or give up material things, another option is to add a spiritual practice.

“I decided that I am going to start having quiet time with God,” Cody Harper, a second-year political science major, said. “I decided to take 10 or 15 minutes out of my day just to sit and talk to God or maybe just read something out of the Bible.”

Cheyenne Sibell, a third-year transfer student, decided to give up being sarcastic.

“I wanted a challenge and I know my sarcasm can come off as mean,” Sibell said.

Observation of Lent ends on April 13.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email