Professor edits, plans book on environment

Dr.+Susan+Cohen%27s+new+book+includes+a+collective+of+22+submitted+essays.+
Back to Article
Back to Article

Professor edits, plans book on environment

Dr. Susan Cohen's new book includes a collective of 22 submitted essays.

Dr. Susan Cohen's new book includes a collective of 22 submitted essays.

Photo by Brad Dress

Dr. Susan Cohen's new book includes a collective of 22 submitted essays.

Photo by Brad Dress

Photo by Brad Dress

Dr. Susan Cohen's new book includes a collective of 22 submitted essays.

Brad Dress, Associate Editor

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Millennials believe it’s time to stop damaging the environment—before it’s too late, according to a new book edited by an AACC English professor.

The book, “Coming of Age at the End of Nature: A Generation Faces Living on a Changed Planet,” is an anthology—a collection of writings by young writers of this generation—co-edited by AACC creative writing professor Susan Cohen and Julie Dunlap of University of Maryland University College.

The book reveals the new generation’s stance on climate change.

Cohen and Dunlap sent out a call for papers to young writers and environmentalists across the country in 2012. By sending out the call, Cohen wished to solicit personal essays from writers younger than 30 who wished to write about the effects of climate change.

“We’re coming closer and closer to the point of no change” when it comes to stopping global warming, Cohen said. “It’s really important to hear from and engage the next generation” about the environment.

The editors set few guidelines or restrictions because Cohen said they wanted the writers to freely discuss issues and personal anecdotes concerning the environment.

She received around 600 submissions, and 22 essays made it into the book.

Former AACC student William Thomas contributed his essay to the book, and Cohen accepted it into the final version.

Thomas wrote about scavenging through Baltimore’s abandoned warehouses, and how in a time of scarcity, humans must gather treasures where they find them.

Although no other AACC students wrote for the book, some said they recognize the dangers humans are wreaking on the environment.

“It is going to be our responsibility to fix any impact we have had [on the environment],” Bri Edwards, a second-year math major, said.

According to the book, climate change has caused soil erosion and rising seas to sink islands in the Pacific Ocean and raise the strength of storms. It says animals are also in increased danger.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email